Public Health Announcement Division of Public Health

Public Health Announcement Division of Public Health

Public health officials are warning of the dangers of contracting viral hepatitis this season. Viral hepatitis is a serious liver disease that is spread through contact with the blood, urine, feces, or saliva of an infected person. Symptoms of viral hepatitis can range from mild to deadly and can take many weeks or even months to develop. There are several ways to get infected with viral hepatitis, including through contact with contaminated water, food, or surfaces; by touching an infected person; or by receiving a blood transfusion from an infected person. If you think you may have contracted viral hepatitis, please see your doctor immediately. Prevention tips for preventing viral hepatitis include avoiding contact with people who are carriers of the virus, washing your hands often, and avoiding drinking water or eating food from uncooked sources.

Symptoms of Viral Hepatitis

Symptoms of viral hepatitis can range from mild to severe, and can be accompanied by a variety of symptoms. Some common symptoms of viral hepatitis include fever, fatigue, abdominal pain, jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes), dark urine, clay-colored stools, and nausea. In some cases, only one or two of these symptoms may be present. However, in more serious cases, all of the above symptoms may be present. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms and believe that you may have contracted viral hepatitis, please see your doctor for an evaluation.

What You Can Do berita viral To Prevent Viral Hepatitis

The Public Health Announcement Division of Public Health wants to remind the public about the importance of prevention against viral hepatitis. Viral hepatitis is a serious and potentially deadly infection that can be spread through contact with blood, saliva, mucus, or other body fluids from an infected person. The virus can also be spread by contact with objects or surfaces that have been contaminated with the virus. Preventing viral hepatitis is important not only for the individual who is infected, but also for the community as a whole. Here are some tips to help you protect yourself and your loved ones: Wash your hands often, especially after using the bathroom and before eating food. Avoid close contact with people who are sick or have recently been in contact with someone who is sick. Stay informed about outbreaks of viruses and keep up to date on vaccinations recommended for your age group. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that everyone aged ≥12 months get a screening test for hepatitis B. This is an important public health recommendation, as hepatitis B is a leading cause of death from liver disease in the United States.